Durga Mata Temple, Thawe, Gopalganj, Bihar

11:17 AM MANJEET CHAURASIA 10 Comments








This holy story pertains to about 14th century AD. King 'Manan Singh' from 'Chero' dynasty was ruler of 'Hathuwa'. Although Manan Singh was a devotee of Maa Durga but he was having a proud nature. He claimed to be the greatest devotee of Maa Durga and did not like other saints and religious persons. People were not happy with the King due to his unkind nature and behavior.






















The fort in which the king resided was located at present 'Thawe'. One 'Rahashu' lived in the same village who was a true devotee of 'Maa Kamakhya'. People used to call him 'Rahashu Bhagat' to convey their respect to him.




Once there was a great famine in the state of Hathuwa. People started to die due to hunger. There was very bad condition everywhere, but the king continued to levy tax even in that miserable condition. Poor people became sadder due to the cruel attitude of the king. They did pray to 'Maa Kamakhya' for relief. To relieve her devotees from their grief and pain, Maa Kamakhya appeared in midnight while sitting on seven lions and told to Rahashu Bhagat to cut 'Katara' (grass) and to worship her in midnight. Rahashu Bhagat used to cut 'Katara' (grass) whole day and yielded it in midenight by seven lions of Maa Kamakhya. Thus he got 'Manasara' (a type of holy Rice). Every morning Rahashu Bhagat distributed the Manasara among poor people. Rahashu Bhagat became very famous because he had relieved the poor people from their hunger.












When the king came to know about all these developments, he became very angry and called Rahashu Bhagat and insulted him. The king ordered Rahashu Bhagat to call Maa Kamakhya to prove his true devotion.

Rahashu Bhagat requested the king not to do so and suggested the King to pray the Maa with an honest heart but the king insisted to call Maa and threatened Rahashu Bhagat to kill in case of disobedience. At last, helpless Rahashu Bhagat started to pray Maa Kamakhya to call her. On the call from her true devotee, Maa Kamakhya started her journey sitting on seven lions from Kamrupa (Assam) where she is known as 'Kamakhya Devi' to Thawe.








Rahashu Bhagat again requested the King to drop his insistence but the king did not agree and forced Rahashu Bhagat to call Maa. Meanwhile Maa appeared in Vindhyachal for sometime and was called Maa 'Vindhyavasni Devi'. In her way to Thawe Maa reached Kalighat in Calcutta and was called Maa 'Kalka Devi'. Rahashu Bhagat again requested king to quit his wish and warned him for mass destruction but the king was not agreed.


In her way to Thawe Maa stayed at Patna for a while and was called 'PatanDevi'. Then Maa appeared in 'Aami' and 'Ghodaghat' was called 'AmbikaBhawanii' and 'Ghod Devi' respectively.



When Maa reached 'Thawe' the weather and appearance of the place began to change. Due to hundreds of thunders King's palace fell and destroyed. Everyone was feared. The devotees of Maa started to pray her to save them as they had known that Maa had reached Thawe.






After sometime, Maa appeared through broken head of Rahashu Bhagat and showed her right hand wearing a 'Kanagan' (Bracelet). The four handed Maa appeared sitting on the seven lions and blessed her devotees. On the pray from her true devotees, Maa made the things normal and disappeared.





Rahashu Bhagat got 'Moksha' (heaven). The king, his palace and all his empire came to end. The remnants of the palace may be seen even today around the temple of Maa at Thawe.







The devotee of Maa built a temple where Maa appeared. They also built a 'Rahashu-Temple' where Rahashu Bhagat used to pray Maa. It is said that after 'Darshan' (visit) of Maa Thawewali, Darshan of Rahashu-Temple is mandatory to please Maa.












































Maa is also called 'Singhasini Bhawani'. Maa Thawewali is very kind and generous to her devotees and fulfills all their wishes. To know more detail about "MAA THAWEWALI" CLICK HERE

"Jai Maa Thawewali"

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Golden Temple, Amritsar, india

1:27 AM MANJEET CHAURASIA 2 Comments

GOLDEN TEMPLE, AMRITSAR, INDIA


Sri Harmandir Sahib, also known as Sri Darbar Sahib or Golden Temple, (on account of its scenic beauty and golden coating for English speaking world), is named after Hari(God) the temple of God. The Sikhs all over the world, daily wish to pay visit to Sri Amritsar and to pay obeisance at Sri Harmandir Sahib in their Ardas.


Guru Arjan Sahib, the Fifth Nanak, conceived the idea of creating a central place of worship for the Sikhs and he himself designed the architecture of Sri Harmandir Sahib. Earlier the planning to excavate the holy tank (Amritsar or Amrit Sarovar ) was chalked out by Guru Amardas Sahib, the Third Nanak, but it was executed by Guru Ramdas Sahib under the supervision of Baba Budha ji. The land for the site was acquired by the earlier Guru Sahibs on payment or free of cost from the Zamindars (landlords) of native villages. The plan to establish a town settlement was also made. Therefore, the construction work on the Sarovar(the tank) and the town started simultaneously in 1570. The work on both projects completed in 1577 A.D.

Guru Arjan Sahib got its foundation laid by a muslim saint Hazrat Mian Mir ji of Lahore on 1st of Magh, 1645 Bikrmi Samvat(December,1588). The construction work was directly supervised by Guru Arjan Sahib himself and he was assisted by the prominent Sikh personalities like Baba Budha ji, Bhai Gurdas ji, Bhai Sahlo ji and many other devoted Sikhs.

Unlike erecting the structure on the higher level(a tradition in Hindu Temple architecture), Guru Arjan Sahib got it built on the lower level and unlike Hindu Temples having only one gate for the entrance and exit, Guru Sahib got it open from four sides. Thus he created a symbol of new faith, Sikhism. Guru Sahib made it accessible to every person without any distinction of Caste, creed, sex and religion.

The building work completed in 1601 A.D. on Bhadoon Sudi 1st, 1661 Bikrmi Samvat (August/September,1604). Guru Arjan Sahib installed newly created Guru Granth Sahib, in Sri Harmandir Sahib and appointed Baba Budha ji as its first Granthi i.e. the reader of Guru Granth Sahib. After this event it attained the status of ‘Ath Sath Tirath’. Now the Sikh Nation had their own Tirath, a pilgrimage center

Sri Harmandir Sahib, is built on a 67ft. square platform in the centre of the Sarovar(tank). The temple itself is 40.5ft. square. It has a door each on the East, West, North and South. The Darshani Deori (an arch) stands at the shore end of the causeway. The door frame of the arch is about 10ft in height and 8ft 6inches in breath. The door panes are decorated with artistic style. It opens on to the causeway or bridge that leads to the main building of Sri Harmandir Sahib. It is 202 feet in length and 21 feet in width.

The bridge is connected with the 13 feet wide ‘Pardakshna’ (circumambulatory path). It runs round the main shrine and it leads to the ‘Har ki Paure’ (steps of God). On the first floor of ‘Har ki Paure’, there is continuous reading of Guru Granth Sahib.

The main structure of Sri Harmandir Sahib, functionally as well as technically is a three-storied one. The front, which faces the bridge, is decorated with repeated cusped arches and the roof of the first floor is at the height of the 26 feet and 9 inches.

At the top of the first floor 4 feet high parapet rises on all the sides which has also four ‘Mamtees’ on the four corners and exactly on the top of the central hall of the main sanctuary rises the third story. It is a small square room and have three gates. A regular recitation of Guru Granth Sahib is also held there.

On the top of this room stands the low fluted ‘Gumbaz’(dome) having lotus petal motif in relief at the base inverted lotus at the top which supports the ‘Kalash’ having a beautiful ‘Chhatri’ at the end.

Its architecture represents a unique harmony between the Muslims and the Hindus way of construction work and this is considered the best architectural specimens of the world. It is often quoted that this architecture has created an independent Sikh school of architecture in the history of art in India.

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Birla temple, new delhi, india

1:02 AM MANJEET CHAURASIA 0 Comments

delhi 2 t



BIRLA TEMPLE, New Delhi, India



Laxminarayan Mandir is one of the major temples and landmarks of Delhi. During 1933-39, Laxmi Narayan Temple was built by Mr. B.D. Birla of Birla Group of Industries, one of the famous business tycoons of India. Being constructed by the Birlas, the temple came to be known as Birla Temple. Located on Mandir Marg near Connaught Circus in Delhi, the temple is easily accessible from the city by metro, local buses, taxis and auto-rickshaws.

Birla Mandir is first of the temples made by Birlas across the country and till date, the funds to support this temple come from Birla family. The famous temple is accredited to have been inaugurated by Mahatma Gandhi in 1939. At that time, Mahatma Gandhi kept a condition that the temple would not be restricted to the Hindus and people from every caste would be allowed inside. In those times, the condition was really worked upon; still people visit this temple with full devotion.

Laxminarayan Temple is dedicated to Lord Vishnu, the preserver and his consort, Goddess Lakshmi. The architecture of the Temple looks imbibed from the Orissan Style. The temple has tall spires and it looks magnificent raised in red sandstone. The tallest spire of the temple extends to the height of 165 feet whereas the additional spires lengthen to 116 feet. The exotic structure of the temple comprises sculptures, tall spires and Jali work making it a remarkable to behold.

Apart from the idol of presiding deity, the temple has remarkable idols of Goddess Durga, Lord Shiva, Lord Ganesha, Lord Rama and Lord Hanuman. Geeta Bhawan is a huge hall that is embellished with striking paintings, derived from the scenes of Indian mythology. On the rear end, one can trace gardens and fountains in the temple complex. The two-storied verandahs, on the three sides, are overlooked by the interior court.

For tourists, temple authorities have made adequate arrangements of guest house in its complex. Many International scholars come here to learn about the Hindu religion and for the time, they usually stay in the guest house of Birla Temple. Every year, Janmashtami (birthday of Lord Krishna) is celebrated with full gusto and fervor in this temple. In fact, Birla Mandir is famous for its celebration of Janmashtami. People in large number come to visit this temple of spiritual legacy.

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Kutubminar, delhi, india

12:56 AM MANJEET CHAURASIA 0 Comments

Delhi 3t (KUTUBMINAR)



KUTUBMINAR, DELHI, INDIA


Inspired by the Minaret of Jam in Afghanistan and wishing to surpass it, Qutbuddin Aibak, the first Muslim ruler of Delhi, commenced construction of the Qutb Minar in 1193, but could only complete its base. His successor, Iltutmish, added three more stories and, in 1386, Firuz Shah Tughluq constructed the fifth and the last story. The development of architectural styles from Aibak to Tughluq are quite evident in the minaret. Like earlier towers erected by the Ghaznavids and Ghurids in Afghanistan, the Qutb Minar comprises several superposed flanged and cylindrical shafts, separated by balconies carried on Muqarnas corbels. The minaret is made of fluted red sandstone covered with intricate carvings and verses from the Qur'an. The Qutb Minar is itself built on the ruins of the Lal Kot, the Red Citadel in the city of Dhillika, the capital of the Tomars and the Chauhans, the last Hindu rulers of Delhi. The complex initially housed 27 ancient Hindu temples which were destroyed and their debris used to build the Qutb minar.[1] One engraving on the Qutb Minar reads, "Shri Vishwakarma prasade rachita" (Conceived with the grace of Vishwakarma), this is thought to have been engraved by the enslaved Hindu craftsmen who built the minar.[3]

The purpose for building this monument has been variously speculated upon. It could take the usual role of a minaret, calling people for prayer in the Quwwat-ul-Islam mosque, the earliest extant mosque built by the Delhi Sultans. Other possibilities are a tower of victory, a monument signifying the might of Islam, or a watch tower for defense. Controversy also surrounds the origins for the name of the tower. Many historians believe that the Qutb Minar was named after the first Turkish sultan, Qutb-ud-din Aibak,[4] but others contend that it was named in honour of Qutbuddin Bakhtiar Kaki,[5] a saint from Transoxiana who came to live in India and was greatly venerated by Iltutmish.

The nearby Iron Pillar is one of the world's foremost metallurgical curiosities, standing in the famous Qutb complex. According to the traditional belief, anyone who can encircle the entire column with their arms, with their back towards the pillar, can have their wish granted. Because of the corrosive qualities of sweat the government has built a fence around it for safety.

The minar did receive some damage because of earthquakes on more than a couple of occasions but was reinstated and renovated by the respective rulers. During the rule of Firoz Shah, the minar's two top floors got damaged due to earthquake but were repaired by Firoz Shah. In the year 1505, earthquake again struck and it was repaired by Sikandar Lodi. Later on in the year 1794, the minar faced another earthquake and it was Major Smith, an engineer who repaired the affected parts of the minar. He replaced Firoz Shah's pavilion with his own pavilion at the top. The pavilion was removed in the year 1848 by Lord Hardinge and now it can be seen between the Dak Bungalow and the Minar in the garden. The floors built by Firoz Shah can be distinguished easily as the pavilions was built of white marbles and are quite smooth as compared to other ones.

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